Skip to main content

Kevin Marks

Day 2 Saving webmentioned URLs to archive.org #100DaysOfIndieWeb

1 min read

With many pages vanishing from the web this week, we've been thinking about archiving in

One thing that several people have started to do is to send their posts and the pages they link to to the internet archive

I was already doing this for all SVG's posted to svgshare.com, my vector image sharing site (though I fixed some bugs in that today too).

But what could I do for my other posts? Well, I previously made mention-tech to send webmentions, which is handy for my static posts on kevinmarks.com, so I made it ping the archive for both source and target URLs in the webmention sent. Do try it yourself.

Kevin Marks

Day 1: improving Indiecard #100DaysOfIndieWeb

1 min read

A while back I made unmung.com/indiecard which displays a preview card for indieweb pages, such as Tantek's page. I added explciit support for h-recipe when working out how to rescue the BBC recipes website, eg Yorkshire Pudding

I tried it on Aaron's recipes, like these cookies and it was originally failing as aaron didn't have an h-card in his p-author,  just a URL. I made it cope with that, then made it show something for all the top-level  items on the page, rather than just the first.

That shows Aaron's full h-card from the footer, and also looks nice with pages like his photos and as bonus will show the full thread on a mastodon.social post like this one

Do try it on your own URLs and let me know how it looks.

 

Kevin Marks

Starting #100daysOfIndieweb

1 min read

Inspired by Aaron's "100 Days of Indieweb", I'm aiming for 100 days of visible improvements to my IndieWeb projects. The challenge is to ship something visible and post about it for 100 days. Some of the improvements may be super tiny, some of them might be big. 

It needs to be an improvement to something I use myself, and it must also have a publicly visible result. So improving a closed source tool that only I use doesn't count, but if it's an improvement to something like unmung, which others can use, then that counts.

The other part of the challenge is to post about each improvement under   tag on my website.

If you're interested in joining the challenge, read more on the IndieWeb wiki, and add yourself there!

Kevin Marks

Kevin Marks

Entitlement

1 min read

Blogposts do feel superior to notes as they have titles.

Kevin Marks

15. Indieweb cross site replies: Kevin Marks

1 min read

URL: http://indiewebcamp.com

Having your own website doesn't mean you are cut off from social websites. You can comment on your own site and have replies show up on other people's sites, and on silos like twitter and facebook, using Micropub and Webmention.

Kevin Marks

Kevin Marks

Soi-disant Genius is a magnet for condescension

1 min read

If you were designing a site to attract condescending mansplainers, you couldn't do better than News Genius, which encourages people to annotate things they read online, displays these annotations on top of the original and awards you "IQ points" for doing so.

Over the weekend, the site was used to harass Ella Dawson but their response has been to deny the problem (and to scribble condescendingly all over her post). 

I made a small script to redirect people using the genius.it prefix to the original, if you have the ability to embed javascript on your site.

Also Vijith Assar came up with an approach that mangles your webpage to be full of invisible unicode separators so Genius can't parse it. I really don't recommend installing that, as it is burning down your own site for every other viewer and crawler.

The real answer is for Genius, Inc to respect robots.txt and to use an honest referer when proxying your site so that it can be blocked by the author.

Kevin Marks

Well done!

1 min read

I think Ashton is the first person to be able to play all 3 roles in SWAT0

Kevin Marks

Twitter's Tragedy of the Comments

2 min read

A response to <a href="http://nielsenhayden.com/makinglight/archives/016450.html#What%20we%20really%20need%20for%20free%20speech%20is%20a%20varied%20ecosystem%20of%20different%20moderators,%20different%20regimes,%20different%20conversations.%20How%20do%20those%20spaces%20relate%20to%20one%20another%20when%20Twitter,%20Reddit,%20and%20the%20chans%20flatten%20the%20subcultural%20walls%20between%20them">Abi's post</a>

The characterisations of 'echo chamber' or 'filter bubble' as opposed to 'public discourse' miss the point. There is no one public- there never was. Literary theory talks about each work having a 'public', and reactions to the work having 'counterpublics'.

Thinking about the web as set of partially overlapping publics makes a lot of sense, and one of the great things that twitter did originally was accommodate that well. We followed people we were interested in, read some of their tweets, responded to some, retweeted some to our own public and so on. There was a place on the side of the stream where you could look a replies to your tweets, from those you didn't follow, but it was very much secondary

However, Twitter misunderstood the strengths of this, and in their urge to drive engagement, packed the app with notifications. The most egregious of these was making @ replies the primary notification, and the Big Red Number on the app on iOS. Suddenly, it was another email inbox where others' priorities were ranked above your own choices.

Chasing engagement, they listed all the replies under the posts, whether you followed the people concerned or not. They had reinvented unmoderated blog comments too.

Then of course, the Tragedy of the Comments occurred, just as it has done from the dawn of time. The power to force people to see your reactions to their comments is very hard to resist, and it changes the tone of the discourse.

Now Twitter is trying to mitigate this, but blocking and muting only affects what you see, not what others see in response to your posts. So you may have a trail of abuse attached to your posts that is visible to everyone but you.

Twitter doesn't realise it needs to cherish its tummlers.